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honeybee Mar

*Inviting Bees to
Your Landscape*

       Bees are very important not only to agriculture (they pollinate about 75 % of fruits, vegetables and nuts species around the world), they are also very important to many flowering plants.  About 70 % of flowering plants rely on insects for pollination, bees being one of the more important pollinators.  Your landscape can benefit greatly from attracting bees.         Consider placing a block for orchard mason bees in your landscape.  Orchard mason bees pollinate spring fruit trees, flowers and vegetables.  They are non-aggressive and one may observe them at a close range without fear of being stung.  Directions for making a block from scrap lumber can be found on the NC State Website at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Other/note109/note109.html        Ground dwelling bees will be showing up soon around the coastal plains and most in the piedmont and foothills a week or so later.  They may scare people but they are non-aggressive and beneficial for pollination. Remember, don’t spray with insecticides plants that are blooming.

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honeybee Mar

*Inviting Bees to
Your Landscape*

       Bees are very important not only to agriculture (they pollinate about 75 % of fruits, vegetables and nuts species around the world), they are also very important to many flowering plants.  About 70 % of flowering plants rely on insects for pollination, bees being one of the more important pollinators.  Your landscape can benefit greatly from attracting bees.         Consider placing a block for orchard mason bees in your landscape.  Orchard mason bees pollinate spring fruit trees, flowers and vegetables.  They are non-aggressive and one may observe them at a close range without fear of being stung.  Directions for making a block from scrap lumber can be found on the NC State Website at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Other/note109/note109.html        Ground dwelling bees will be showing up soon around the coastal plains and most in the piedmont and foothills a week or so later.  They may scare people but they are non-aggressive and beneficial for pollination. Remember, don’t spray with insecticides plants that are blooming.

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lettuce oct

*March Edibles*

Planting        It's time to plant cool weather crops.  In the piedmont, as soon as the soil can be worked, plant lettuce, mustard greens, sugar snap peas, radishes, onions, potatoes, spinach and cole crops.  If a ball of soil crumbles after being squeezed in your fist, the soil is workable. Transplant cabbage, broccoli and other members of the cabbage family now.  Protect them from temperatures below 20° F. In the mountains, mid-March is a good time to start tomato transplants indoors for planting in the early May.         Asparagus spears should be making an appearance in the next couple of weeks. Pest Control   Pest control for peaches and apples is critical in the period right after blooming, check the Disease and Insect Managment in the Home Orchard guide for details.. Pruning:        There is still time to finish pruning grape vines.  They may drip sap, but that isn’t a problem.  Prune roses by removing all but 4 to 6 canes.  Cut above an outward facing bud.

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lawn trees

*Early Spring Lawn
Care*

             Herbicides are a temporary solution to a permanent problem – weeds!  New weed seeds will always be travelling into your yard.  The best long-term solution to controlling weeds is to have a healthy lawn.  Control the weeds you already have before they get large and set seed.  A little work now will save a lot of trouble later.         Cool season lawns should have been fertilized before now.  They will not need to be fertilized again until September.  If you fertilize them now, it will encourage the growth of a fungal disease called brown spot.  Warm season grasses do not need to be fertilized at this time.         Start mowing once your lawn reaches 4 to 5 inches tall and never mow back to less than 3 inches.  Grass clippings should be small enough to fall between the grass blades.  Don’t collect clippings unless they are heavy enough to smother the grass.         When using mulch near your house foundation, use mulch that doesn’t contain cellulose, such as pine needles and pine bark.  The less cellulose in the mulch, the fewer termites are attracted to it.  Also, never spread mulch up to the foundation or lowest course of siding on your home.  While it may have a nicer appearance, it can allow termites to use the cover of mulch to invade your house undetected.  Fresh wood chips and sawdust can be used on the surface as mulch but do not mix in with the soil where they would tie up nitrogen making it unavailable to plants.  Since wood chips contain cellulose it is preferable to use them away from the house foundation.

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NC Cooperative Extension Cut Flower Portal

Cut Flower Portal

NC Cooperative Extension Cut Flower Portal[/caption] Comprehensive Cut flower information including new cultivar evaluation, production strategies, postharvest handling and more.

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NEWS View All
http://floricultureinfosearch.ces.ncsu.edu/

Floriculture InfoSearch

Floriculture InfoSearch is a powerful, but focused search engine designed to bring you floriculture information from the scientific literature, trade and association magazines/websites, NC State University, and the American Floral Endowment Floriculture Archive MORE »

Porcupine with a sweet potato body and green bean spines.

Veggie Varmint

The “Veggie Varmint” contest, hosted at the Burke County fair each year, is delightful, creative way to connect children with produce. Without the pressure to “EAT IT”, children (and adults) are encouraged to MORE »

Downy Mildew
Image by Gerald Holmes, courtesy of Bugwood

Downy Mildew

Downy mildew is here! Look on the tops of leaves for angular, yellow to brown wounds that stop at a leaf vein. Management suggestions: • Plant early in the season so you can MORE »

Greenstriped Mapleworm1398055Bugwood

Greenstriped Mapleworms

Greenstriped Mapleworms Greenstriped mapleworms are found in the piedmont the end of June and early July. As their name suggests their preferred hosts are maple trees, but they are also found on boxelder MORE »

Emerald Ash Borer 
(Image Courtesy of Bugwood)

Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer, a beautiful but extremely destructive, exotic insect pest, has now been detected in North Carolina. These beetles kill ash trees by feeding on the trunks. So far Person, Granville, MORE »

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EVENTS View All
Growing In Place Symposium - Natural Learning Initiative - RaleighThu Mar 5, 2015
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM Where:
Marbles Museum, 201 East Hargett Street, Raleigh, NC 27601
— 4 days away
Dig-In! Weaving Edible Landscapes, Community Gardens and Urban Ag into the fabric of our community - RaleighSat Mar 7, 2015
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM Where:
Marbles Kids Museum, 201 East Hargett Street, Raleigh, NC 27601, United States
— 6 days away
Plantsmen's Tour - JCRA 2nd Tuesday of Month 1pm - RaleighTue Mar 10, 2015
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Where:
4415 Beryl Road, Raleigh, North Carolina.
— 1 week away
Plantsmen's Tour - JCRA 2nd Tuesday of Month 1pm - RaleighTue Apr 14, 2015
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Where:
4415 Beryl Road, Raleigh, North Carolina.
— 1 month away
Plantsmen's Tour - JCRA 2nd Tuesday of Month 1pm - RaleighTue May 12, 2015
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Where:
4415 Beryl Road, Raleigh, North Carolina.
— 2 months away
Pollinator Gardening Workshop & Garden TourTue May 12, 2015
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
Pittsboro, NC
— 2 months away
8th Annual Pollinator Day CelebrationSat May 30, 2015
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM Where:
Pittsboro, NC
— 3 months away
Plantsmen's Tour - JCRA 2nd Tuesday of Month 1pm - RaleighTue Jun 9, 2015
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Where:
4415 Beryl Road, Raleigh, North Carolina.
— 3 months away
More Events